SUPPORT THE WORK

DURING GREAT GRAY WEEK

© KURT LINDSAY

ABOUT #GIVE4GREATGRAYS

SUPPORT THE RESEARCH. JOIN THE TEAM.

In conjunction with #GivingTuesday, May 3 - 10, 2020

WHO: Great Gray Owl, Strix nebulosa

WHAT: Great Gray Owl research and monitoring

WHY: Snag conservation and population study

WHERE: Western Montana study sites

WHEN: Year round research

Despite their captivating beauty and popularity, there is much we do not know about these elusive forest owls.

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© KURT LINDSAY

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© KURT LINDSAY

Great Grays are the tallest North American owl, standing up to 33 inches tall with 5 foot wing span. Despite their impressive stature, they soar silently through dense forests and are expertly camouflaged when settled in to roost.

 

Although primarily nocturnal, they sometimes perch conspicuously during the day, and will hunt diurnally during the breeding season. Most of the time, however, they seem to disappear into the forest. Without the aid of their booming hoots, they are incredibly hard to find. This is one reason so little is known about them.

While there is much we don't know about Great Grays, some things are clear. We know that large snags, which serve as important nest sites, are often in short supply.

Time and time again, we find snags removed from otherwise ideal Great Gray habitat. Snags are a critical component of forest ecosystems and provide homes for a myriad of species.

Similar to cavity nesting owls, Great Grays depend on specific site characteristics to nest. For these large owls, broken-topped snags, or the abandoned nests of other large birds, are critical components to nesting.

Some timber harvesting practices represent a leading a leading threat to Great Gray Owls. Those that remove large areas of habitat; or those that remove the snag trees used for nesting and the fallen timber used by young birds for roosting and protection.

That's why much of our work around this species is focused on snag conservation.

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Understanding is the first step in helping. Your contributions make our dedicated field work possible - monitoring populations, working to preserve nest sites, and tirelessly expanding our understanding of Great Gray Owls. Our findings create the foundation of effective conservation - for Great Gray Owls and the habitat they depend on.

At the Owl Research Institute, we believe in a future for Great Grays. With nesting season underway, there's no better time to support this important work.

Please make a donation right away to ensure Great Gray research and conservation continues!

From all of us at ORI - THANK YOU!

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© KURT LINDSAY

During the breeding season, our research includes surveying for Great Grays, searching for nest sites, and monitoring the nests throughout the breeding season. Chicks are banded and, when possible, the adults. When the owls have left the nest, a series of tree measurements and site characteristics are recorded. In doing so, a model develops - one that can be used to manage for, and preserve, these important trees.

Forests have seen great change through the years. Many of the largest trees - those most important to Great Grays - have been cut down long ago, and still today. But others remain. Others are still growing. Thoughtful timber harvesting is critical to the future of Great Grays.

How can you help impact the future for Great Gray Owls?

You can help by donating to critical Great Gray research and conservation.

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© KURT LINDSAY

© KURT LINDSAY

#GIVE4GREATGRAYS

GIVE NOW TO SUPPORT THEIR FUTURE

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